We are in final preparations for Workday and the Integrated Service Centre going live on November 2.

Monitor

The position of your monitor will significantly impact your posture. Positioning your monitor too high promotes neck extension, while positioning it too low promotes neck flexion. See below for more helpful hints.

 

Ideal monitor positioning

Image
Monitor ideal

The rotating picture above illustrates how to position your monitor if you have 1 or 2 monitors.

  • Top line of text at eye level
  • Approximately arm’s length away
  • Adjust font size (generally it is better to increase font size and position monitor further away)

Lighting:

  • Minimize glare: position monitor perpendicular to window and between banks of light; adjust blinds as needed
  • If it is too bright around your monitor, consider turning off 1 bulb and using task lighting (you need more light for paper based work than for computer work)
  • Adjust screen brightness (external buttons on bottom/side of monitor). Preferred brightness will depend on your vision and your environment (70 to 80% tends to be comfortable for most people).

Two Monitors:

  • If you have 2 monitors, position them slightly further away to increase your field of view
  • If one is your primary monitor, keep the primary monitor in the centre and place the secondary one on an angle (if you use your mouse on the right it will likely be easier if your secondary monitor is also placed on the right)
  • If both monitors are used equally, center both and angle in slightly
  • Look away from the screen for 20 seconds for every 20 minutes

Monitor too high

Image
Monitor too high

The rotating picture above illustrates the differences with positioning the monitor too high relative to the eyes as compared to one that is at the correct height.

Risks:

  • Neck extension increases the strain on the neck musculature
  • Your natural line of sight is slightly downward, looking up dries out your eyes. To avoid this discomfort most people tilt their head back (neck extension) thereby raising the height of the eyes relative to the monitor. This may be more comfortable initially but in the long run will strain your neck and upper shoulder muscles.

How to Fix:

  • Lower monitor, or
  • Raise chair (& use footrest if needed)

Monitor too low

Image
Monitor too low

The rotating picture above illustrates the differences with positioning the monitor too high relative to the eyes as compared to one that is at the correct height.

Risks:

  • Neck flexion and/or forward leaning

Note: if you wear bifocals then you will need to position your monitor lower. This is because you are looking through the bottom part of your glasses to view the screen

How to Fix:

  • Raise monitor (check if monitor is height adjustable or place a book or platform under the monitor)

Monitor too far/font too small

Image
Monitor too far

The rotating picture above illustrates the differences with positioning the monitor too far or having font too small as compared to one that is at the correct distance.

Risks:

  • Promotes forward leaning which increases strain on neck and upper back musculature.

How to Fix:

  • Increase font size
    • Increase overall font through display settings
    • [ctrl] & [+] or [ctrl] & scroll on mouse wheel-quickly increases or decreases what’s on your screen
    • To increase outlook settings check online
  • Position monitor closer
NEXT: MOBILE COMPUTING >>

 

 
UBC Crest The official logo of the University of British Columbia. Urgent Message An exclamation mark in a speech bubble. Caret An arrowhead indicating direction. Arrow An arrow indicating direction. Arrow in Circle An arrow indicating direction. Arrow in Circle An arrow indicating direction. Time A clock. Chats Two speech clouds. E-commerce Cart A shopping cart. Facebook The logo for the Facebook social media service. Home A house in silhouette. Information The letter 'i' in a circle. Instagram The logo for the Instagram social media service. Linkedin The logo for the LinkedIn social media service. Location Pin A map location pin. Locked A locked padlock. Mail An envelope. Menu Three horizontal lines indicating a menu. Minus A minus sign. Pencil A pencil indicating that this is editable. Telephone An antique telephone. Play A media play button. Plus A plus symbol indicating more or the ability to add. Search A magnifying glass. Settings A single gear. Speech Bubble A speech bubble. Star An outline of a star. Twitter The logo for the Twitter social media service. Unlocked An unlocked padlock. User A silhouette of a person. Vimeo The logo for the Vimeo video sharing service. Youtube The logo for the YouTube video sharing service.