Vaccines and workplace wellbeing

Human Resources partners with the UBC Pharmacists Clinic to share vaccine information with faculty and staff.

Why do we need vaccinations?

Vaccines save lives. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that vaccines save 2-3 million lives worldwide every year. In the past 50 years, vaccines have saved more lives in Canada than any other medical intervention. Vaccines protect against mor­e than 25 debilitating or life-threatening diseases, including measles, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, meningitis, ­influenza, tetanus, typhoid and cervical cancer.

Vaccines prevent outbreaks. Cases of diseases that can be prevented with vaccines have decreased over the years. Yet, the pathogens that cause these diseases still exist. Vaccination rates must remain high until diseases are completely eliminated to protect ourselves. 

Vaccines are an important part of herd immunity. Herd immunity or indirect protection from infectious diseases is achieved through vaccination. The majority of the population needs to be vaccinated and immune to infectious diseases to limit the spread of pathogens.

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Graphic depicting herd immunity

Learning resources

  • It can be difficult to understand the importance of vaccines and how you can access them. This recorded webinar for faculty and staff from the UBC Pharmacists Clinic and Human Resources covers the immune system, how vaccines work, vaccine safety, introduction to COVID-19 vaccines, and navigating the resources available to you. 
  • There are certain vaccines that are recommended for all adults. Learn more about the vaccines and most recent recommendations on ImmunizeBC website. A schedule and cost of recommended vaccines is a useful tool to understand when and why you might need a certain vaccine. Some of the recommended vaccines are publicly funded and free to you, while others may need to be purchased. 

COVID-19 vaccines

At this time, UBC does not provide COVID-19 vaccinations directly to faculty and staff, but we can assist you in finding the information you need. You can also find more helpful information about vaccines on the UBC COVID-19 page.  

Canada’s vaccination program has made tremendous progress in the fight against COVID-19. The approved COVID-19 vaccines are being rolled out across B.C. as we speak, and everyone aged 12+ in BC can now register to get vaccinated. UBC encourages all members of our community to support the provincial vaccine program. Vaccines are the best way to protect yourself – and everyone around you – from COVID-19.

Register today by visiting the BC Government’s How to get vaccinated for COVID-19 page.

For those living or working at the UBC Vancouver campus, when you chose the location to have your vaccine administered there is a clinic located at the Pharmaceutical Sciences Building. This clinic is run by Vancouver Coastal Health, not by UBC, and is only open till August 2021 — it could be a convenient location to receive your COVID-19 vaccine.  

Vaccination through your benefit plan

Vaccination cost coverage is available through your Extended Health Benefits Plan and Health Spending Account if applicable to your employee group.

Workplace vaccinations

Occupational & Preventive Health (OPH) provides eligible faculty and staff with immunization reviews and vaccinations. If your work involves potential exposure to certain diseases or specific work environments, you can book a virtual appointment with an OPH Nurse to find out what vaccinations are recommended for you.

Where can I get an immunization assessment? 

UBC Pharmacists Clinic and Occupational & Preventive Health provide assessments for UBC faculty and staff. Visit their respective web pages to book an appointment. Be ready for your appointment by preparing questions and bringing your previous immunization records. 

Project background - Survey

This work has been informed by a survey with staff and faculty, conducted in July 2020. From this survey, we found that 10% of respondents come to their employer as a key source of information on vaccines. This page will be updated with new and emerging vaccination information on a regular basis. 

Health & Wellbeing Disclaimer

The wellbeing information on this website is provided as information only and should not serve as a substitute for the consultation, diagnosis, or treatment from qualified physicians, mental health care providers, or other health care providers.  External resources have been carefully selected but are not produced by UBC and UBC is not responsible for the content nor does UBC endorse products or services mentioned on these sites.  Suggested links and resources are intended to educate but not to replace UBC policies, procedures or advice from health professionals.

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